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Author Archives: nikki

All Moved In

After a week I am now in my new apartment. It was quite an accomplishment! 10pm Uganda time we moved in under the veil of darkness – and it wasn’t easy. Unfortunately, the bed wasn’t complete yet, so some guys were sawing and hammering for an hour… Everything is slow here!
My mosquito net is the wrong size (too small) so I am now half under it with pillows holding it down, and the varnish on the bed frame is giving me a headache. However, I am happy to say I have a lot of steel between me and the outside, as well as, steel padlocks on my steel doors and I am bolted in snug as a bug in jail. I have many many keys and feel like I am in Alcatraz prison.
My shower was nice even though the design is quite bizarre:)

Today in the village we looked for land and had some good luck..
I also found one of my kids was sick so since I have a car still we took her right to the clinic immediately! Had I not had the car she wouldn’t have made it to the clinic because it is too far. We found out she has malaria. So she now has medicine and I pray she heals quickly. It’s so amazing how in America such a thing as this trip to a clinic is taken for granted. Here the distance and cost for transport prevents many from getting to a clinic. If God hadn’t put Healing Eyes in touch with this village than each child we help wouldn’t know compassion.
This makes me smile and justifies the insane heat, lonely nights, steel cage, and absence of meals.

Goodnight to all and remember today as you rest your head on your pillow that a little girl is in a grass hut feeling a bit better knowing God is caring for her thru our prayers and Action taken to be here in Africa

Sarah

nikki

The difference 1 year can make

I am reading my old journal from St Croix and one year ago as I prepared to leave to return to Michigan I wrote this…

“It will be ok. I will give you more children than you can imagine. Be ready when I call and go when I say to. Study my word and prepare your heart and faith. Support will come in ways you can’t imagine quite yet. Go to Michigan and then wait. St Croix will still be here and the kids are watched over. You did what you needed to do now go.”
“Sarah trust me in the coming months. It will be hard but each change will be easier for you to adapt. I am training you for mobility and travel. Teaching you when to go and when to stay. Molding your heart to withstand storms to lean on me. Planning is no more. It’s now My time to shape you . Trust me to lead you and don’t let go of my hand.”
“Pain is my gift to you my child. With it comes wisdom and great responsibility. Leadership and the willingness to do my work. No more working for others or yourself…. You will work for me”

1 Peter 5:10
And the God of all grace, who called you to his eternal glory in Christ, after you have suffered a little while, will himself restore you and make you strong, firm, and steadfast.

And now it’s a year later and I’m in Africa suffering with the least of these and those who want to do me harm… And there are more children than I can count.
Does God mean what he says? Hmm maybe…

nikki

I Made It

Hello everyone (habari)

I am writing to you all from Ugandan soil. I’m currently in Tororo, the main city in which I’ll be staying. The last few days of travel have been filled with difficulty and frustrations. The difficulties first began in the airport in Chicago where I was forced to unpack all of my belongings due to the new KLM weight restriction. It was awful and cost me a huge fee because my bag that was supposed to be a carry-on was now considered a third bag. The devil was let loose and tried to test my resolve. I nearly gave up had it not been for my fiancé who stood strong and spoke truth to combat my melt down. It helps to have a supportive guy who loves me and the work in Africa that we want to do together. So, after much tears, we made it through the airport goodbyes. Once arriving in Africa, there were less difficulties. Everything went pretty smoothly besides a delay the next day, but that was typical Africa time.

Today I’ve been sick, but I made an attempt to make it through the day. I mattress hunted by the border of Kenya for cheaper prices. I also bought a fan. Finally, I went to the school around 4pm and was met by the children who were eagerly awaiting my arrival. They then proceeded to serenade me. I gave some encouraging words to them and they clapped. After that, the pastor and I talked some business. I topped off my day by bringing a small girl to the clinic. (The clinic is a shack in the village trading center that has one lady who trades with pills.) The girl had a swollen finger that was paining her. In Africa, almost every sickness is thought to be Malaria, but this young child does have Malaria (this was found out because the lady checks everyone with a blood test). So, we will be treating her with two ailments on a child today. Luckily, we caught the finger soon. Otherwise, it would have swollen more and busted open with puss and the fingernail would come off. Catching Malaria early was incredibly lucky, and the pills only cost $2 rather than the $21 dollars one would pay in town! The medical situation here is messed up and leans more to people dying rather than easy fixes..

Highlight: This little girl did remember me when she first saw me and giggled for the first time which in turn brought me a smile! 🙂

Unfortunately, I am still waiting on my house… Can’t move in until Saturday they say. But based on what I saw I’ll be shocked if they finish construction by then… again… African time.

Thanks for your prayers… Please keep them coming as the loneliness is strong and it’s still 2.5 months until Don comes to visit me.

Sarah

nikki
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